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Cbd oil for ibs and anxiety

CBD Connects The Dots Between IBS, Anxiety, Stress, And Sleep

That moment when something stressful happens and your stomach feels like a fiery pit of molten hot lava. With a side-order of too many coffees to get you through a hard day. If that sounds familiar and you experience frequent stomach upset, balancing your digestive tract is a necessity.

When you talk about diet and nutrition, many people think it is just about the number of calories, fats, vitamins, and minerals you consume. That’s part of it for sure. But what is most important is understanding how to balance your gastrointestinal tract and gut health because more than 70% of your immune system functioning starts in your digestive system.

By now, you probably know that all the different systems within your body are interconnected. When one thing isn’t working the right way, other symptoms or conditions may start to develop. It is like a nice car that has a damaged component in the engine.

You may not see it. You may not feel it (right away), but eventually, you will have a performance issue. Because when everything isn’t working correctly, something is apt to breakdown and stop working the way that it used to. The human body is the most sophisticated technology on the planet, and like a mechanical engine, everything is interconnected.

Behind many chronic diseases is a hidden threat, inflammation. That, too, is triggered by a high-stress environment or experience. Many patients feel improvement after using CBD oil or tinctures or consuming non-intoxicating CBD edibles. And for some health conditions, CBD may be a safer alternative therapy.

Meet the “Fight or Flight” Natural Energy Reserve: The Stress Hormone Called Cortisol

Are you feeling stressed out? Sometimes we don’t even know that we are experiencing stress until noticing the physiological signs. That could be indigestion. It could include passive symptoms like dry mouth or more noticeable side-effects like heart palpitations and perspiration.

All of the symptoms you notice when you are stressed, have to do with many different sensory systems in your body, from the central nervous system that sends and receives signals to two cannabinoid systems. Silently (and sometimes not-so-silently) responsible for the emotions and symptoms of stress.

Back in prehistoric times, when we had to run for our lives from predators and hunt for our meals every day, the stress hormone became useful. Do you know when your favorite Sci-Fi movie shows a ship that jumps into hyperdrive? Imagine your whole body went to “red alert,” which starts a chain sequence of events.

Some are short-term and go away in a few hours. Others can last days or weeks. And in the most severe cases of chronic stress, it can last years. And when sustained daily stress is part of your life, it can take a toll on your health.

Those predators ran fast (and we had to outrun them). And our prey ran just as quickly (and we had to catch them). Cortisol developed as an essential hormone in the human body to provide that extra energy boost when we need to run to catch, or avoid becoming, dinner.

That sounds rather good, right? Like having a super-powered energy reserve that your body could use in a life or death situation. No Red Bull’s required! But just like race car drivers can hit the nitro for a burst of speed to win the race, the stress hormone cortisol wasn’t designed to last forever. Just for short intervals as needed. And then, we made an evolutionary and cultural leap to modern-day, where many aspects of life can trigger cortisol frequently. Daily in some cases. And that’s where the problem begins.

The Health Dangers of Chronic Stress and Sustained Long-Term Cortisol

Jetpack analogies aside, long-term, and sustained stress is terrible for our health. There are many reasons why modern life is more stressful. People are working longer hours. Light pollution in urban areas can keep our minds active, making it harder to sleep. We eat more unhealthy food and snack on stimulants that also cause stress in the body by elevating both blood sugars (carbohydrates) and hypertension (blood pressure).

We are flipping that switch into “fight or flight” mode every day as we experience intense stress. But the problem is that we don’t turn off the switch. Our busy schedules do not allow for the downtime and relaxation that it takes to reduce cortisol levels. Going back to a race car engine’s analogy, your body is still running at max capacity, and on an empty tank.

There is more bad news when it comes to the stress hormone. Sustained or chronic levels of high cortisol can be the precursor to several types of chronic diseases and symptoms. It nearly burns out other systems your body relies on for good health and impairs the immune system.

A Tale of Two Systems Triggered by Increased Stress (or the Absence of It)

How does cortisol create the energy rush we feel when experiencing high stress? Inside the human body, two systems have opposite functions. But both of them relate to stress or relaxation.

The parasympathetic system provides messaging and symptoms that tell the body it is “okay to relax.” During periods where the parasympathetic system is functioning well, sleep quality is improved. Breathing is regulated, and that helps cells, tissues, and organs to remain oxygenated.

The sympathetic system, however, is a global “red alert” to your body. The experience of high degrees of stress is translated as a threat by your brain and central nervous system. Remember how our body reacts to a “fight or flight” situation? Large amounts of the cortisol hormone are released, which becomes both a fuel source for the body and a way to trigger other responses including:

  • Increased heart rate (provides more oxygen than required to muscles and tissues)
  • Elevated hypertension (can improve alertness and improve mental acuity)
  • Dilation of the pupils (happens during excitement or stress)
  • Increased body temperature and perspiration

The parasympathetic system provides messaging and symptoms that tell the body it is “okay to relax.” During periods where the parasympathetic system is functioning well, sleep quality is improved. Breathing is regulated, and that helps cells, tissues, and organs to remain oxygenated.

Your brain is continuously running a “risk versus reward” analysis during every strenuous or stressful situation. If we manage to navigate our way out of the problem, the brain will release dopamine. That is the “feel good” hormone. When we feel it’s time to rest or relax, the brain releases the hormone to help us stay in that relaxed state.

Can’t Remember Your Dreams? Cortisol Can Increase Anxiety and Disrupt Sleep

If you have chronic stress, chances are you already know. Maybe you have talked to your doctor about your high blood pressure? Or, looking for a solution to frequent bouts of insomnia? One symptom that many people discount is the absence of dreams. That can be one of the first early warning signs of chronic stress.

When an individual has low or balanced levels of cortisol, they generally have few problems falling asleep. However, high levels of cortisol can disrupt the kind of deep restorative sleep that your body needs. You only dream (and experience rapid eye movement) or REM when you are relaxed. So, if you never remember your dreams, chances are you are not achieving that sleep. And unmanaged high levels of cortisol are a likely culprit.

Can CBD help with insomnia?

High-quality CBD strains contain a terpene that is valuable to wellness. Myrcene has a sedative impact. Researchers aren’t sure whether it is the CBD or the combination with myrcene that contributes to a relaxed state and better sleep. Another popular source of myrcene is hops, and you probably know how you feel after a beer or three.

Both CBD and THC are known to contribute to drowsiness and sleep. But it may be the powerful anti-inflammatory properties of terpenes and cannabinoids that helps relieve the body of stress, promoting restorative sleep.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Digestive Upset Caused by Chronic Stress

What is the link between chronic stress and irritable bowel syndrome or IBS? The stress hormone cortisol is created after HPA axis activity in the hypothalamus. This creates colon movement, which starts to shake things up in the bowels. That is a side-effect of HPA axis activation.

There is a practical reason why cortisol helps trigger bowels’ evacuation; we could run faster if we eliminated some of our waste. This is a common reaction for mammals. For humans? It’s more than a little uncomfortable. It can sometimes lead to painful constipation. If you think about it, it is the opposite trait a human needs to get away from a dangerous situation. Unless you consider that the body doesn’t feel it is “safe to stop” for any reason at all, including a bowel movement.

With IBS, chronic stress, and high levels of produced cortisol lead to overactivity of the bowels, quickly inflamed. The inflammation typically causes diarrhea. It can also cause painful gas, bloating, and nausea. Some studies have suggested that patients with IBS vary in terms of both stress and activity level. For instance, one study suggested that patients with IBS were over-achievers and more active. Slowly only when they feel unwell or close to burnout.

Can CBD help with irritable bowel syndrome?

Some patients have found relief from irritable bowel syndrome by using a full-spectrum CBD oil. Research is inconclusive, but clinical studies have speculated that CBD may naturally elevate endocannabinoids in the body. Patients with IBS have abnormal gut bacteria, and a condition called dysbiosis is an imbalance of good and bad microbes in the digestive tract.

Does Cortisol Make Symptoms of Clinical Anxiety Worse?

What comes first? High anxiety or insomnia? The two health symptoms seem to go together in terms of diagnosis. No one is sure which one comes first. But what is understood are the health risks that both insomnia and anxiety pose to patient wellness.

There have been many clinical research studies published about the potential of CBD oil and anxiety management. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America estimates that 40 million adults live with a diagnosis of anxiety (aged 18+).

It is estimated that anxiety disorders impact 18.1% of the population. According to the ADAA, less than 40% of patients with diagnosed (or undiagnosed) anxiety get treatment for their condition(s). Some new studies suggest that anxiety may even have a genetic or inherited aspect.

The anxiety that is not managed therapeutically can contribute to both physical and mental health problems. Addiction rates are higher among patients who have General Anxiety Disorder (GAD).

Can CBD help with symptoms of anxiety?

In one clinical study published in 2015, “ Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Anxiety Disorders ,” participants with clinical anxiety and depression reported improvement and symptom relief after three weeks of dosing CBD. Another study, “Use of cannabidiol in anxiety and anxiety-related disorders,” [Journal of American Pharmacists Association] reported similar findings and results.

Fast Uptake or Slow Release CBD? What is Better for Stress Relief

The short answer is “both.” If you feel anxiety or stress symptoms, a few drops of CBD oil under the tongue can help you start to back-down cortisol levels naturally. However, for some patients, a supplement capsule of CBD taking one or more times per day may be more effective. Providing sustained relief all day.

The Verdict on CBD for Mental Wellness and Effective Stress Management

Cannabinoids and terpenes from cannabis and hemp can have wellness benefits without marijuana and THC’s psychoactive properties. Because IBS, anxiety, depression, and insomnia have a strong symptomatic correlation for patients.

CBD may be an effective way of reducing cortisol triggers by lowering the body’s inflammatory response to stress. And that can reduce the onset of gastrointestinal problems and the risk of developing chronic diseases that are caused by chronic inflammation.

And if your preference is to use a ratio CBD: THC cannabis product to manage symptoms instead? Learn more about the “ entourage effect .” Some scientists believe that when combined, CBD and THC offer the most substantial wellness benefits.

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CBD for IBS: Benefits, Dosage, & How to Use It?

Irritable bowel syndrome or IBS is a chronic inflammatory condition of the digestive tract. This causes stomach ache, painful abdominal cramping, constipation or diarrhea, urgent bowel movements, and bloating of the stomach. Triggers like stress, eating certain foods, and even hormonal changes make the symptoms worse.

While we lack specific studies focusing on CBD and IBS, many people find that CBD helps control their symptoms. Not only is CBD safe to take daily, but it also helps maintain a healthier gut.

In this article, we’ll discuss different ways CBD helps relieve IBS symptoms. We’ll also cover how to use CBD and get the best dosage for your IBS.

What is Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Irritable bowel syndrome often gets confused with inflammatory bowel disease. While both conditions share many similar symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome is inflammation of the digestive tract, while inflammatory bowel disease is inflammation of the bowel walls.

The exact cause of IBS remains unknown, but a family history of IBS increases your risk of developing this chronic health problem. Several factors also worsen the condition. These include food, illness, stress, depression, anxiety, hormonal changes, etc.

Left untreated, IBS can cause extreme fatigue and tiredness, worsening mental health problems, heartburn, and indigestion.

How is Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treated?

IBS has no known cure, and no drug can fully control the disease. We only have medications that provide symptom relief. These include fiber supplements and laxatives for constipation as well as antidiarrheal medications.

Analgesics and anticholinergic drugs may also be given for painful spasms of the gut. For anxiety and depression, anxiolytics and antidepressants may be prescribed.

Change in diet also helps, so know your food triggers and avoid them. We also recommend getting enough sleep and going on a regular exercise program.

With CBD’s increasing popularity as an anti-inflammatory agent, many people add CBD to their health regimen. They find that it helps them deal with the symptoms and improve their quality of life.

How can CBD control your IBS symptoms, and how do you use CBD for IBS?

The Endocannabinoid System and Your Digestive System

The endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays an active role in your digestive system and helps regulate many of its functions . The ECS helps modulate gut motility as well as gut permeability. It also influences hunger signaling and interacts with the gut’s normal microbiota.

When there’s a noxious stimulus like an illness or consuming something toxic, the gut cells release endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) that bind to the cannabinoid receptors of other gut cells.

Activation of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor slows down peristalsis. This series of involuntary gut muscle contractions move food from the esophagus down to the small intestine. The type 1 cannabinoid receptor also reduces the secretion of gastric acid. All these allow better absorption of food.

Activation of the type 2 cannabinoid receptor, on the other hand, influences the immune cells found in the gut.

Endocannabinoids offer many therapeutic effects, but unfortunately, their effects don’t last long. They’re easily degraded by enzymes and quickly reabsorbed back into the cells.

Chronic gut problems also affect the health of your ECS, resulting in ECS dysregulation. ECS dysregulation, in turn, worsens many intestinal problems, including IBS .

How Does CBD for IBS Help Improve Symptoms?

CBD doesn’t directly activate the type 1 cannabinoid receptor but stimulates other receptors responsible for symptom control. CBD directly binds to the type 2 cannabinoid receptor found on the immune cells, activating it to produce anti-inflammatory effects.

Below are some of the beneficial effects of CBD for IBS.

CBD and Gut Pain

People suffering from IBS often complain of abdominal pain. This is sometimes triggered by food and relieved by a bowel movement. The abdominal pain may also cause painful bloating of the stomach.

CBD acts on several receptors responsible for modulating pain sensation. These include the vanilloid, glycine, serotonin, and adenosine receptors. When CBD activates these biological systems, they “tell” the cells to stop releasing pain-generating chemicals .

CBD stimulates not just the pain receptors on the gut cells but also on the brain cells.

CBD and Gut Inflammation

Inflammation serves as the body’s primary defense. Once it detects the presence of bacteria, toxins, or illness, for example, it sends immune cells to the area. The immune cells then engulf the attackers and the cellular debris they cause.

Unfortunately, the constant bombardment of noxious stimuli worsens inflammation. Inflammation gets deteriorated by the immune cells releasing chemicals that signal more immune cells to the area. All these results in chronic, low-grade inflammation of the gut, which, of course, makes IBS symptoms worse.

CBD acts as a potent anti-inflammatory agent in the gut and its inner lining. It binds to the type 2 cannabinoid receptors on the immune cells and triggers a cascade of chemical signals. This effect stops immune cells from releasing pro-inflammatory compounds and also induces the death of the abnormal immune cells .

CBD also targets other receptors that control inflammation, such as PPARy, serotonin, vanilloid, GPR55, and adenosine receptors .

Due to its remarkable anti-inflammatory properties, researchers analyzed the potential benefit of CBD in treating ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, and IBS,

CBD and Gut Motility

IBS affects gut motility. The abnormal gut contractions may result in constipation, diarrhea, or a combination of the two. It also causes stomach cramping with painful bloating.

In normal situations, CBD only produces a weak inhibitory effect on gut motility. However, CBD shows a modulatory effect when gut motility is abnormal and helps normalize constipation or diarrhea gut motility.

Again, CBD produces these effects through non-cannabinoid receptors.

CBD and Anxiety and Depression

People with IBS have a high risk of developing mental health problems like anxiety and depression . While mental health problems don’t cause IBS, they can aggravate IBS symptoms since they increase the brain cell’s sensitivity to pain.

CBD produces antidepressant and anti-anxiety effects through its stimulation of the serotonin receptor . It also helps maintain the balance between the neurotransmitter levels in the brain, an imbalance of which may result in anxiety and depression.

CBD and the Endocannabinoid System

As mentioned earlier, ECS dysregulation contributes to the worsening of IBS symptoms.

Now, CBD promotes a healthier ECS. Not only does CBD stimulate the ECS, but it also allows the endocannabinoids to stay longer in the system.

Studies found that CBD actively competes with the endocannabinoids in binding to the enzymes. With more CBD attaching to the enzymes, the endocannabinoids stay longer in the body and produce more health benefits .

How to Use CBD for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Most CBD products tell you to take a full dropper for your IBS symptoms daily, but because we’re all built differently, this dose may either be too high or too low for you. Either way, incorrect CBD dosage prevents you from enjoying the full therapeutic effects of CBD.

The rule of thumb when finding the right CBD dosage is to use:

  • 1 mg of CBD per 10 pounds of body weight for low-strength dose (mild symptoms and general health)
  • 3 mg of CBD per 10 pounds of body weight for medium-strength dose (moderate symptoms)
  • 6 mg of CBD per 10 pounds of body weight for high-strength dose (severe symptoms)

Let’s say, for example, that you weigh 150 pounds and are experiencing severe IBS symptoms, and then you’ll need at least 90 mg of CBD.

To know how much CBD is in one full dropper, you have to divide the total milligrams of CBD by the size of the bottle.

If you bought an extra-strength CBD oil at 3000 mg of CBD in a 15 mL bottle, then divide 3000 by 15, and you’ll get 200. This means that one full dropper gives you about 200 mg of CBD. Because one full dropper contains about 20 drops, each drop gives you about 10 mg of CBD. For your severe IBS symptoms, you’ll need nine drops of CBD oil.

If you developed some adverse side effects on your first dose, reduce the amount when taking your CBD oil next. However, if you didn’t feel anything on your initial dose, we suggest staying on it for at least three to five days before increasing the dose.

Remember, our bodies respond differently to CBD. Some may feel immediate effects, while others may not, so let your body get used to CBD first before adjusting the dose.

Take notes of your body’s reaction to CBD as well. List down the CBD dose, the time you took the oil, the effects, etc. This will help you find the right CBD dose.

The best thing about the trial-and-error approach is that you’re given the freedom to find the best CBD dose that relieves your IBS symptoms.

How to Choose Your CBD Product

The CBD market offers hundreds of CBD brands, so to help you reach an informed decision, please consider these factors: types of CBD, forms of CBD, quality of the CBD products.

Types of CBD

The types of CBD include pure, broad-spectrum, and full-spectrum CBD products.

As the name implies, pure CBD only has CBD isolate. It contains no extra ingredients. Broad-spectrum and full-spectrum CBD, on the other hand, not only contain CBD but extra cannabinoids as well. They also contain essential terpenes that boost the effects of cannabinoids. What sets the two apart, though, is that full-spectrum CBD also has THC.

Hemp-derived CBD has a THC level of no more than 0.3% and is available to everyone even without a doctor’s recommendation. Marijuana-derived CBD, on the other hand, typically has a higher THC level and may only be available in states that legalized marijuana. Before buying marijuana-derived CBD, know your state’s CBD laws to avoid problems.

What’s better among the three types then?

They all help relieve IBS symptoms. However, the addition of THC in full-spectrum CBD makes it stronger and more effective in controlling symptoms. THC boosts the effects of both the cannabinoids and terpenes — it’s a phenomenon called the entourage effect.

Forms of CBD

The most common forms of CBD products include CBD oils, tinctures, edibles (gummies, candies, bars, brownies), capsules, vape oils, concentrates, flowers, and even suppositories. Suppositories deliver CBD closest to the digestive tract so that they may work best for severe IBS symptoms.

The effects of CBD edibles take some time (about 30 minutes to an hour), depending on your metabolism. CBD goes through the digestive system and liver first before entering the bloodstream.

Their effects can take less than 30 minutes for the rest of the CBD forms since CBD bypasses the digestive system and liver. The cells immediately absorb them, and CBD directly joins the bloodstream.

Edibles produce the longest duration of effects since CBD gets to stay longer in the body. On the other hand, these effects are delayed due to the first-pass metabolism in the liver.

Whatever type and form of CBD you choose, you need to use CBD religiously to enjoy its full effects.

Quality of the CBD Product

Again, the CBD market remains unregulated, so you have to know what to look for in premium-quality CBD products when you buy locally or online. These include:

  • Laboratory test result or certificate of analysis by a certified third-party: This shows the CBD product’s quality, potency, and safety. It looks for the presence of toxic residues, harmful residual solvents, heavy metals, and pathogenic microbes. It also makes sure that the product contains its stated cannabinoid and terpene profiles and potency.
  • CBD source: The source material must be organically grown and free from artificial pesticides. CBD should also be extracted using safe and clean methods like the supercritical CO2 extraction process.
  • Customer reviews: These tell a lot about the CBD product, so stay away from those receiving more negative feedback than positive ones.

Final Thoughts — Can CBD for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Benefit You?

Irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic medical condition that can negatively affect your daily life. If left untreated, the symptoms will only worsen and prevent you from enjoying life.

CBD has many properties that may prove effective for IBS symptom management. Not only can it help control pain and inflammation but also help with gut motility and mental health problems associated with this disease.

Are you using CBD for IBS? Does it help with your symptoms? Share your experience below.

References Used in the Article:

  1. DiPatrizio N. V. (2016). Endocannabinoids in the Gut. Cannabis and cannabinoid research, 1(1), 67–77. https://doi.org/10.1089/can.2016.0001 [1]
  2. Atalay, S., Jarocka-Karpowicz, I., & Skrzydlewska, E. (2019). Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Cannabidiol. Antioxidants (Basel, Switzerland), 9(1), 21. https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9010021 [2]
  3. Martínez, V., Iriondo De-Hond, A., Borrelli, F., Capasso, R., Del Castillo, M. D., & Abalo, R. (2020). Cannabidiol and Other Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoids for Prevention and Treatment of Gastrointestinal Disorders: Useful Nutraceuticals?. International journal of molecular sciences, 21(9), 3067. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21093067 [3]
  4. Kabra, N., & Nadkarni, A. (2013). Prevalence of depression and anxiety in irritable bowel syndrome: A clinic-based study from India. Indian journal of psychiatry, 55(1), 77–80. https://doi.org/10.4103/0019-5545.105520 [4]
  5. de Mello Schier, A. R., de Oliveira Ribeiro, N. P., Coutinho, D. S., Machado, S., Arias-Carrión, O., Crippa, J. A., Zuardi, A. W., Nardi, A. E., & Silva, A. C. (2014). Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativa. CNS & neurological disorders drug targets, 13(6), 953–960. https://doi.org/10.2174/1871527313666140612114838 [5]
Nina Julia

Nina created CFAH.org following the birth of her second child. She was a science and math teacher for 6 years prior to becoming a parent — teaching in schools in White Plains, New York and later in Paterson, New Jersey.

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CBD for IBS: Everything You Need to Know

IBS is frustrating. There are few effective treatments for the condition, which can make it hard to live your life to the fullest.

Here’s how CBD might be able to help.

Article By

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not life-threatening, but it can severely disrupt the quality of life for those affected.

Roughly 1 out of 10 people in the developed world have symptoms consistent with IBS [3].

Despite how common the condition is, IBS is not well understood. As a result, there are few effective treatment options available aside from managing symptoms.

Here we’ll go over how CBD may be used to support an IBS diagnosis, how to use it, what its limitations are, and how to get the most out of it with other diet and lifestyld modifications.

MEDICALLY REVIEWED BY

Updated on November 14, 2021

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The Benefits of CBD Oil For IBS

There are many potential causes for IBS, but much of what triggers the condition remains unknown. Most of the causes point to a loss of equilibrium in the digestive tract. So the carefully orchestrated balance involved with digestion, absorption, immune defense, and excretion is compromised.

Cannabidiol (CBD) helps with this problem because it serves as a way to “calibrate” different parts of the body. It does this by improving the communication between cells through the endocannabinoid system.

The benefits of CBD oil for IBS Include:

  • Addresses anandamide deficiencies [13]
  • Reduces inflammation [7, 8]
  • Inhibits digestive muscle hyperactivity and cramping [5, 6]
  • Decreases appetite [9]

CBD will affect the condition differently depending on the form of IBS.

People who have IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) are likely to experience the most benefit from CBD because cannabis slows muscle contraction in the digestive tract.

But people who have IBS with constipation (IBS-C) can still find benefit from CBD due to the anti-inflammatory, appetite-suppressant, and immune-stimulating properties of the compound.

We’ll get into the different forms of IBS and how CBD is used to support them later on.

What Form of CBD Should I Use?

CBD comes in all different forms. You can buy oils, capsules and concentrates.

When it comes to IBS, the most popular options are oils, capsules, and suppositories.

CBD oils and capsules are easy to take, to store for long periods of time, and can be accurately dosed.

Suppositories have the benefit of delivering the CBD directly to the affected area. This is best for severe IBS-D (more on this below) but can benefit other forms of IBS as well.

What’s The Dose of CBD Oil For IBS?

Dosing CBD can be a challenge because it affects everybody differently.

Some people take 50 mg of CBD per day, while others need more or less.

The dose also depends on the form of CBD you’re taking. As we mentioned, CBD oil and suppositories are the most popular for people with IBS, but the dose for each form varies significantly.

If using oils or capsules, the best way to find a good starting dose it to read through our CBD oil dosing guide.

CBD Dosage Calculator

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For IBS, we recommend starting at the low strength and working your way up slowly to see how you react to CBD.

It will likely take about two or three weeks of regular CBD use before you start noticing any real benefits for your IBS symptoms.

If using CBD suppositories, it’s best to follow the specific instructions listed by the supplier on the packaging. Concentrations can vary from one CBD suppository to the next.

How to Get the Most Out of CBD Oil for IBS

CBD shouldn’t be used alone to treat IBS. This condition is highly complex and involves multiple organ systems.

Other forms of treatment, including dietary changes and physical activity, are essential. If these lifestyle changes aren’t addressed, CBD is not likely to have any effect at all.

You can think of CBD as a bus driver — it will drive the occupants towards a destination, but they can’t arrive without a well-maintained bus filled with gas.

CBD is a tool to help alleviate uncomfortable symptoms of IBS and is used to bring the body back to balance.

What is CBD Oil?

CBD stands for cannabidiol. It’s one of the primary cannabinoids in the cannabis plant.

Most CBD oils on the market today come from the hemp plant (Cannabis sativa), which is a strain of cannabis naturally low on THC — the primary psychoactive cannabinoid.

This means that most CBD products on the market have no psychoactive effects.

CBD is used as a health supplement for a wide range of medical conditions. It owes much of its ability to support health to its involvement with the endocannabinoid system.

The endocannabinoid system regulates balance in the body, otherwise known as homeostasis. This includes the immune, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and integumentary (skin) systems.

What is Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Irritable bowel syndrome (or IBS) is classified as a syndrome, rather than a disease because it’s a set of symptoms that can’t be linked to a particular cause.

IBS can be summarized as a “widespread dysfunction of the digestive tract.”

Symptoms involve bloating, abdominal pain, indigestion, and changes in bowel movements (constipation or diarrhea, which can be severe).

The symptoms of IBS are very similar to those of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The difference is that IBD has inflammation present in the gastrointestinal tract, confirmed by Lab tests and special cameras inserted in the digestive system.

If no inflammation is present to confirm a diagnosis of IBD, an IBS diagnosis is given instead.

In this process, there are some diagnostic criteria put in place by various experts, but none of them are conclusive and not all doctors agree on them for a diagnosis of IBS.

The most popular criteria doctors tend to use is something called the Rome III Criteria.

IBS Diagnosis: The Rome III Criteria Checklist

In order to meet a diagnosis of IBS, the patient must have the following symptoms:

  • Recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort at least 3 days per month over 3 months
  • Symptoms involving at least two of the following characteristics:
  • Improvement of symptoms with defecation
  • Onset associated with a change in stool frequency
  • Onset associated with a change in stool form

If these criteria are met and there is no other explanation for a cause (such as inflammation, traumatic damage, or infectious disease) the patient is diagnosed with IBS.

Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome:

3 Types of IBS & the Effects of CBD

20-50% of visits to a gastroenterologist end in a diagnosis of IBS [3], making it the most common functional disorder of the digestive system.

Gastroenterologists further classify IBS according to the most predominant symptoms:

1. Diarrhea-Dominant IBS (IBS-D)

This refers to IBS presented primarily with diarrhea.

IBS-D symptoms indicate that the bowels are filling with water. Common precursors for this include high sodium foods, a poor gut membrane, and hyperactive muscle activity in the digestive tract.

With high sodium foods and poor membrane control, water begins to accumulate in the areas filled with salty foods. This happens because of a principle in biophysics called osmosis: the water goes where the salt is. As the intestines fill up with water, it causes diarrhea.

Additionally, many people with IBS-D experience hyperactive muscle activity in the intestinal tract. When the muscles become spastic, they experience cramping, abdominal pain, and bloating. The digestive tract pushes food through too quickly without properly breaking it down and absorbing it. Instead, unabsorbed foods begin to ferment in the large intestine, causing severe bloating, nausea, and diarrhea.

CBD is useful for this type of IBS because it can reduce spastic muscle activity in the gut, allowing it to properly digest and absorb nutrients. For this type of IBS, it’s best to combine CBD with a low-sodium diet and a good source of soluble fiber.

2. Constipation-Dominant IBS (IBS-C)

IBS-C stands for IBS presented predominantly with constipation.

This type of IBS indicates low activity in the digestive tract. Pancreatic enzymes, bile, and stomach acid are scant. These enzymes help break down our food and stimulate the smooth muscle lining our intestines. This stimulation causes the muscles to expand and contract, moving food along the digestive tract.

If there is a problem with the secretion of digestive enzymes or muscle movement in the intestinal tract, we become constipated.

This can be extremely uncomfortable, causing symptoms such as severe bloating, feelings of fullness, nausea, fatigue, and physical belly distention.

Although nothing will produce the same level of benefit as a change in the diet, CBD does offer some unique benefits to this form of IBS.

CBD increases anandamide — a naturally occurring endocannabinoid responsible for slowing bowel movement, fighting inflammation, and controlling microbiome diversity.

3. Alternating IBS (IBS-A) or Mixed-type IBS (IBS-M)

This form of IBS involves alternating bouts of diarrhea and constipation.

The potential causes of this type of IBS are far more variable and can involve factors of both. For several months, the patient may suffer from constant diarrhea, followed by several months of severe constipation. The sudden changes in bowel activity can be due to dietary, neurological, or immunological factors — making the cause hard to isolate and treat.

CBD is useful for this type of IBS because it doesn’t push the digestive function in any specific direction. Instead, it improves the body’s ability to regulate homeostasis. Along with other therapies to manage symptoms, the body has a better chance of returning to a higher state of health on its own.

What Causes IBS?

The exact cause of IBS is not yet understood — but there are some well-accepted theories in the medical community.

Suspected Causes of IBS Include:

1. Diet

Western countries including Canada, The United States, and Sweden have the highest rates of IBS in the world [11, 12]. In the United States, roughly 1 in 10 people suffer from IBS.

These nations often consume diets high in processed foods. Foods that have been highly processed tend to have poor nutritional content (in terms of vitamins, antioxidants, minerals) and are high in calories (in the form of fat or sugar).

When we eat these foods, they tend to move slowly through our digestive tract due to the lack of fiber and bulk of the food.

The slow movement and high sugar content cause this food to ferment in the digestive tract by bacteria living there. Fermentation in this context is bad for our digestive functioning — it causes bloating, pain, and changes in bowel movements.

One of the main dietary treatments for IBS is called a low FODMAPS diet, which substitutes highly processed foods for high-fiber, low sugar ones.

Frequent fermentation of processed sugars can damage the structural integrity of the digestive lining over time — leading to accumulation of fluid and diarrhea (IBS-D) or lack of movement in the muscles in the small and large intestines causing constipation (IBS-C).

2. Viral Infection

Viral infections can cause a lot of damage to the body. Many people report their IBS symptoms started shortly after getting a stomach bug overseas. After a few days of illness, they seemed to be getting better, but their gut never fully recovered.

Viruses disrupt normal cellular function, hijacking our cells to manufacture more viruses and preventing them from their job. They can wreak havoc on an entire organ in a short amount of time.

The digestive lining is home to a complex ecosystem of bacteria and fungal species called the microbiome. The microbiome is heavily involved with digestion and absorption in the digestive tract. When we fall ill with a virus, this can cause dramatic changes to the microbiome, leaving us with long-lasting side-effects, such as IBS.

3. Neurological Dysfunction

The movement of the intestinal tract (called peristalsis) is a complex orchestra of muscle contractions working together to move food through the intestinal tract. This involves careful innervation both locally and in collaboration with the brain.

Many people find that when they drink coffee, it stimulates a bowel movement. This is a good visualization of how the nervous system affects the digestive tract.

If our nervous system is in a state of constant stimulation, we are likely to develop diarrhea (IBS-D).

If we experience the opposite (insufficient stimulation), we are likely to end up with constipation (IBS-C).

Based on neurological activity, we can compare IBS types with other side-effects that often affect IBS patients at the same time.

Neurological Characteristics of IBS and Related Side-Effects:
IBS type Nervous System Activity Related Side-Effects
IBS-D Too stimulated Anxiety Panic disorders Insomnia Heart palpitations
IBS-C Not stimulated enough Fatigue Depression
IBS-A Either too stimulated or not enough Anxiety Panic disorders Insomnia Heart palpitations Fatigue Depression Immune deficiencies

4. Inflammation

Although IBS by definition does not require visible or detectable inflammation, numerous studies have shown that IBS sufferers have low-grade inflammation of the gut wall [2]. This inflammation may be too subtle to be picked up by blood tests or visual inspection with colonoscopies/endoscopies.

Common Medications Used to Treat IBS

Lifestyle and diet changes will have the most impact on treating IBS. Besides the low FODMAP diet, it can help to reduce stress and get more exercise.

In some cases, medications can be prescribed to help reduce the symptoms of IBS. For diarrhea, drugs like loperamide, rifaximin, or eluxadoline may help. Fiber supplements, laxatives, lubiprostone, or linaclotide can be used to treat constipation. Abdominal pain can be relieved with antispasmodics. Sometimes antidepressants are prescribed for those with more extreme cases.

The Endocannabinoid System & IBS

The endocannabinoid system is thought to play a major role in IBS [10].

The CB1 and CB2 endocannabinoid receptors are used to regulate different processes in the human body — many of which are present in the digestive tract.

CBD for Other Functional Disorders

IBS is considered a functional disorder, suggesting there’s a clear problem with the function of the organ without an apparent cause.

Other conditions that fit this category are fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome — both of which are also improved with regular CBD use. The mysterious nature of these conditions makes it difficult to pinpoint exactly why CBD is so useful for treating them, but the likely explanation is the role CBD plays in homeostasis.

Homeostasis is the state of balance in the body. It penetrates virtually every aspect of life — from body temperature to digestive enzyme secretion. Any issues with homeostasis can negatively affect our health.

CBD serves as a useful tool for regulating homeostasis, which is why this compound has so many different benefits.

Key Takeaways: Using CBD for IBS

Although IBS isn’t well understood, it likely involves a combined dysfunction of multiple organ systems, lifestyle habits, and diet — CBD offers broad benefits towards different variations of the condition.

It’s best to use CBD in the form of an oil, capsule, or suppository for optimal results. It’s also important to take CBD oil for long periods of time to exert its full effects. CBD can take a while to start providing benefits for this condition because there are many factors involved.

Through persistent CBD supplementation, dietary and lifestyle changes, and patience, IBS symptoms can be forced into remission for long periods of time.