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Pregnancy Skin Care Ingredients to Avoid

I’m sure if you’ve been reading my pregnancy skin care series, you know that skin care while you’re pregnant is a bit different than regular skincare. Here I’m addressing specific skin care ingredients and why you might need to avoid them while you are pregnant.

There are definitely some ingredients that you should avoid while pregnant due to possible birth defects. The placenta is basically a big sieve, it lets things through in a very non-specific (and size based) fashion. Your baby is busy doing things like making organs, which means that small mistakes early on can have big effects later on.

While your skin is a barrier, we do know that some of the products you put on it will be well absorbed and those ingredients can reach the blood stream. Which means they can reach the placenta and therefore your baby.

We will never have data regarding safety for many of these ingredients. The studies just wouldn’t be ethical to complete (would you want to be volunteering to try something out and see if it affects your baby? Not me!) so we just make do with the information we do have and try to make some educated guesses.

Pregnancy Skin Care Ingredients to Avoid

Chemical Sunscreens

They’ve been found in your bloodstream, no one really knows what they do… it’s better to stick with the physical sunscreens which sit on the surface of your skin. There have been some published papers linking chemical sunscreens to Hirschsprung’s (1) and hypospadias (2), and are known endocrine disruptors. As well, some chemical sunscreens are also salicylates. For this reason, I recommend avoiding all chemical sunscreens while pregnant.

Note that chemical sunscreens are often found in products that don’t have a listed SPF value. Discussion on that is here: Why did you say this product has sunscreen when there isn’t an SPF?

Retinoids

Retin A/Accutane, Retinoids, Vitamin A: Yes, the big baddies here are definitely the 2 prescription drugs listed first. Accutane is a huge issue with pregnancy as it is linked to many different birth defects. In fact, most physicians won’t even prescribe it to women of child bearing age unless they are also on birth control or sign a waiver.

While Retin A and over the counter retinoids are not as strongly linked to birth defects as Accutane, they are all the same class of drug and as such are on pretty much every MD’s list of no-no ingredients. The retinoids are Vitamin A derivatives, and I’ve seen quite a few lists advising to avoid topical Vitamin A as well, so it’s made my list. Yes, there is still Vitamin A in your diet and your prenatal vitamin. It should be there and can take care of your needs. But, no need to add even more in skin care. Here’s a good peer reviewed article regarding retinoids in pregnancy.

Note that Beta-Carotene is a Vitamin A derivative that is considered separately from the retinoids, and it is considered safe.

I get asked a lot about Rosehip Oil as it is high in Vitamin A. All of the OBs I have asked about this specifically state that they consider it ok to use during pregnancy. Rosehip oil has trans-retinoic acid, not the beta-carotene we consider “safe” during pregnancy. Because Rosehips come from plants, the amount of the retinoid in the oil will vary based on how/where the plant is grown, how/when it is harvested and then how/when the oil is extracted. Lots of variables there. I consider it ok to use Rosehip Oil during pregnancy due to my discussions with OB. If it makes you nervous this is something that is easy to avoid.

Note, Bakuchiol and Bidens Pilosa are ingredients that I am currently screening out as retinoids. Many brands are claiming this is a “natural retinoid” alternative that “works the same way as other retinoids”. I’ve confirmed that they do act through the same mechanism as retinoids. And there are zero studies proving that either is safe. I screen it as a retinoid and recommend avoidance. I frequently get readers arguing with me about this, I can only state what my opinion is and this is up to you. In the case of brands that don’t agree with me, this may be helpful:
Why does X Brand say this product is safe but you don’t think it is safe? (or Vice Versa)
Note, I’m adding Bidens Pilosa to the “avoid” list on 1/26/2022, it’s a very recent addition and I’ll seek out products that contain it and fix them in the lists.

All Hydroxy Acids (Alpha, Beta and Poly)

From malic acid to salicylic acid, pretty much all of the hydroxy acids either are not safe or simply don’t have enough information to say “sure, go crazy and rub this all over you.” So, the official word is that all of they hydroxy acids, alpha, beta and poly, have pregnancy categories that recommend avoidance.

One exception is Lactic Acid, which your body makes on its own (I spend a lot of time in the PICU trying to prevent little bodies from making it, but that’s a whole different issue). Lactic acid has been shown to be fine in pregnant animals, but we don’t have evidence in humans. So, the official recommendation is to use with caution, but as it is found in your body anyways…. I don’t screen it out of products. It is in you already.

I’ve seen a few books that say Glycolic Acid is fine, and there are many physicians that tell this to their patients, but it isn’t universally accepted. However, its official pregnancy category is that there isn’t enough info so should be avoided, especially since there is evidence that is is about 28% absorbed when used topically. The “correct” type of study to prove the safety of Glycolic Acid will simply never be done, so many physicians have looked at the current evidence and feel fine recommending it. I personally avoided it while pregnant and it’s one I look for when recommending products as safe or not.

I also want to point out that Citric Acid is found usually in very small amounts at the very end of ingredient lists. It is typically there to help modulate pH in a product. You likely expose yourself to more Citric Acid in one glass of OJ than you would in a year of using such a product. I avoided it in my first 2 trimesters, but lightened up in my third trimester when I realized I was being a bit silly. I ignore it in products.

The polyhydroxy acid that I currently screen out is gluconolactone.

Hemp/CBD

There isn’t info out there on the safety of Cannabis used topically during pregnancy or nursing. We do know smoking marijuana with THC has bad effects and should be avoided, though it hasn’t been fully decided if it is just the THC or something else as well.

Note that in theory Hemp and CBD do not have THC in them, it’s breed out of the plant is the official status. However, depending upon how it was processed there are CBD oils that test positive for THC. But there are still the unknowns we haven’t decided about. I would not recommend using Hemp or Cannabis products while nursing or pregnant for that reason. Note, this is a highly conservative opinion, but I’m skewed due to my position as a pediatrician.

Sunless Tanners

Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) and Erythrulose are the active ingredient in sunless tanners. The jury is still out on whether sunless tanners are safe. I’ve seen sources that say yes (notably the NHS in the UK), but many that say no. My own OB was anti-sunless tanning while pregnant, it was listed on all of the handouts I was given by the University Clinic, most clinics in the US will state to avoid sunless tanners while pregnant. There is a risk of liver damage due to sunless tanners, even when not pregnant (though this risk is primarily from the sunless tanner pills). Yes, this includes the “natural” sugar products.

I can tell you that my skin has taken on some interesting dry patches while pregnant, and it would be pretty hard to get an even sunless tan. This is a great time to embrace the pale, so I’m going with that.

Skin Lighteners

Hydroquinone: A Tyrosinase inhibitor, this is widely listed as something to avoid in both pregnancy and nursing. Note that Alpha Arbutin is also a tyrosinase inhibitor, as is Kojic Acid.

Licorice Root also acts through inhibition of tyrosine. Note that licorice root extracts do also have other benefits such as antioxidant activity and it soothes skin. Licorice root seems to be present in many products, primarily for those other benefits and not the skin lightening effects. But that effect/mechanism is still there. There are several websites that say licorice root is safe for pregnancy, and it might be, but studies won’t be done to prove safety or danger.

I err on the side of caution and include it on my list of ingredients to avoid. As I call out the ingredient of concern for every product, if you’re ok with Licorice root it is very easy for you to still use those products, just look for the ones where only licorice root is mentioned as a concern.

Prostaglandin Analogues

This is an ingredient category that usually only comes up for lash serums, but this one to avoid due to potential changes in how blood moves around in a baby before birth. This is also why it is recommended to avoid salicylates.

Benzoyl Peroxide

Again, I can’t find this in any actual drug reference books and a literature search didn’t turn up anything of use, but it is listed over and over on lists of things to avoid while pregnant.

Laser Therapy

I’ve seen laser therapy, whether for zapping away birth marks, tattoos or hair, listed over and over on lists of things to avoid while pregnant. As well, most places that offer lasers refuse to treat you if you are pregnant.

I would likely reserve lasers (and at home machines) to be used under the direction of your physician. There is some evidence in the medical literature that laser treatment is safe during pregnancy.

Salicylates

This should include topical willow bark and should be avoided. I also include the related chemical sunscreen ingredients in this list as many are related. This is the same reason for avoidance as aspirin during pregnancy. (Which yes, is sometimes prescribed for pre-eclampsia, but that is a time that the risk/benefit ratio is closely monitored by a physician.)

Things I just don’t know enough about

I’m calling out these ingredients, but it’s really because I don’t have enough info and I’m not quite comfortable saying they’re definitely safe. Consider these to be “use at your own discretion” and know that I’m likely being overly cautious. If you’re ok with them, then you can ignore my warnings about them.

Snail Secretion:

First, can I say that I’m not really sure why we suddenly want to put slimy snail stuff on our faces? Who thought of that? It makes me chuckle. Second, we really don’t have a good handle on what is in it, and there’s absolutely no data about safety during pregnancy. I would avoid it.

Stem Cells

I am worried about these ingredients as they have no safety data, and if they work the way some companies say they work, then I’m not sure I want them on my skin when I’m not pregnant, but definitely NOT when I am pregnant!

Those apple stem cells that are said to penetrate into your skin (which is a barrier by the way, how is a cell in a cream going to break the barrier function to penetrate deep into the dermis?), head to the dermis, where they “proliferate” (aka- multiply) and make the surrounding skin cells do stuff. If this really happened, how do those cells know where to stop? How do you know they aren’t being circulated and heading directly towards the placenta? And doesn’t that sound like apple cancer in your skin? I’d just avoid the whole thing.

Safe Skincare Ingredients During Pregnancy

There are a few ingredients that I get asked about frequently. Based on the evidence there’s no reason to avoid these ingredients. There might be random websites that say to avoid them, some of them I can’t even locate the websites but I get asked a lot. These ingredients are safe.

Parabens

Parabens are currently considered safe by pretty much everyone except the EWG, who have a big propaganda machine and I don’t think they interpret most studies correctly. If you disagree with me about that so be it, I’m just stating my opinion since I’ve been asked over and over. Parabens considered safe for pregnancy and breast feeding. BUT… if an ingredient makes you uncomfortable you should just avoid it. There are so many products on the market these days that it is very possible to do so without any issues.

Hyaluronic Acid

Hyaluronic acid is basically the same thing as Sodium Hyaluronate

I can’t figure out how this became an ingredient that is sometimes on no-no lists, because not only does your body already make a ton of it, but is a big molecule. Huge. It is so large that it just hangs out in the spot where it is made, much too large to get into cells, to pass through membranes or travel to other locations.

Much is the same for any Hyaluronic Acid that you apply to the surface of the skin. Your skin has very tight membrane junctions between those cells on the surface. Hyaluronic Acid can’t get through and just sits there on the surface of the skin. I’m always very suspicious when a company tells me that their HA is different and can get it. It’s a big red flag.

So, since it can’t get in, and your body is already making it anyways, definitely feel that it is safe to keep using HA in your products. It just sits on the surface and helps hold moisture there. We need it to live up to pregnancy glow expectations!

Sulfur:

This is often found in acne treatments, and I haven’t really been able to find much info about safety in pregnancy. Be aware that if you’re allergic to sulfa drugs you should avoid this ingredient, but I’ve seen it as the active ingredient in many “pregnancy safe” acne treatments and is probably fine.

Neem (Azadirachta indica):

While I previously had been calling out Neem as something to watch, I’m not entirely certain upon review with OB friends. This was based on these studies (note, not in humans)- 1, 2, 3. I’ve decided to no longer call out neem as something to avoid until more information comes out.

Various Extracts and Essential Oils

I am frequently asked about specific extracts. Note I’ve only really found convincing evidence that willow bark needs to be avoided in pregnancy, though there are various other websites out there that discuss avoiding specific ones.

I would like to note that during pregnancy you’re a bit more likely to become sensitized/have a reaction to an extract. And what is in an extract exactly can vary depending on how the plant was grown, when it was harvested, how it was extracted, etc. There are a lot of variables. I’m not a big fan of a lot of extracts in my skincare for this reason, and my skin tends to be sensitive to them.

Finally, I do want to point out that there is also moderation in all things. Many things can be more harmful especially in large amounts. I wouldn’t apply a lot of extracts or essential oils while pregnant. I’ve taken care of very ill children in my PICU due to this with “safe” oils such as tea tree oil.

Things I get asked about that I am not worried about

There are many things out there about pregnancy safety (including this blog!) but I would point out that you should consider sources. My list is very conservative overall, but it’s also created by a physician.

Ingredients that I have specifically been asked about but do not have enough evidence currently for me to screen them out:
• Clary Sage
• Propylene Glycol
• Resveratrol
• Rosemary (remember, you can still eat it, which is a much bigger exposure)
• Phenoxyethanol
• Phytic Acid

Things I have some concerns about, but I’m not currently screening out

There are some ingredients that I don’t have enough information about to currently screen out, but I’m a bit leery of and I occasionally look into them to see if I need to start screening them out.

• Neuropeptides: These are ingredients that are said to work like “botox in a bottle” and are known to absorb into the skin in order to work. It isn’t a big leap to say they’re likely circulated throughout the body, and who knows how it would affect a baby?

• Tranexamic Acid: Note, this is often lumped in with the Tyrosinase inhibitors (Hydroquinone, Arbutin, Licorice Root and Kojic Acid) as they are all used to treat hyperpigmentation. However, Tranexamic Acid works via the plasminogen/plasmin pathway, so not really the same thing. Note, it is often taken by mouth as well, so that does make it a bit harder to look at info out there (because which application are you talking about?). You should be careful with this one if you have a history of blood clots, and that makes me a bit leery of it. I haven’t found enough information to recommend avoidance topically.

• Lilial/ Butylphenyl Methylpropional: You likely learned about this ingredient when there was suddenly all of this news everywhere about Olaplex causing infertility. First, that’s unfair to pick on Olaplex (more in a minute), and also it’s a dramatic oversimplification of what’s going on.

My favorite overview is in this IG post from Lab Muffin (a PhD in Chemistry who works in the cosmetic industry). She also discusses a little in this reel and this follow up reel. But basically, when fed extremely large amounts of this chemical, rats had infertility. Rats are incredibly sensitive to things like this. Note, other animals were also tested, but only the rats had issues, and then it was with very high amounts. There’s no data to suggest any issues in humans directly, but if we assume people are as sensitive as rats, and then we try to get you to a small fraction of the dose needed for an exposure to cause an issue (ignoring that we’re talking about topical vs oral, which is very different in terms of absorption), and then we make that dose even smaller because we’re assuming that someone is somehow going to do something crazy and expose themselves even more…and also that you’re using 15 products with the ingredient (because Lilial is found in a large number of cosmetic but also household products, not just Olaplex. It’s a very common fragrance ingredient)…

The EU is known for being particularly reactive/extremely cautious when it comes to reproductive side effects. I’m very conservative in my recommendations for the US, and they’re even more so than I am. You can read the full safety report here.

Currently I’m not screening out this ingredient, and until there is more data about reproductive side effects (particularly with topical use and/or in humans) I’m not currently planning to do so. If the ingredient makes you uncomfortable, you can certainly screen it yourself. As well, since the ban was announced 2 years ago, brands have started reformulating. It’s no longer in Olaplex (and remember, it was in a lot more things that just Olaplex, and also your hair can’t absorb anything anyways). And finally, if you are planning to avoid it, I highly suggest you start with your perfumes, as that’s where you’ll find the highest concentration. I do NOT screen perfumes, instead I have other guidance for how to use your perfumes during pregnancy. More on that here: Perfume during pregnancy

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About Me

I’m a doctor, a mommy and a bit of a beauty addict. If you let me, I can take 2 hours to get ready in the morning. Really. I’m on a quest for faster beauty that works!

450 Comments

Thank you for sharing. Very informative for me. As I am on my 3rd trimester. Stopped using all products that I am not suppose to use. Thought melisma hasn’t changed or been added to. I am looking to change my routine up a bit. I’ll keep your article in mind. Thank you.

What Products would you recommend that are safe during pregnancy to use as facial washes and creams to body lotion?

Thank you so much for your website and advice for pregnant and nursing mamas!

I noticed one of your “safe” facial washes is Philosophy Microdelivery Exfoliating Wash. One of the ingredients is sodium hydroxide. Is that a hydroxy acid?

Benzoyl Peroxide is listed as safe, including by the NIH, so I’m not sure what you’re basing your assertion on.

“When benzoyl peroxide is applied topically, only 5% is absorbed through the skin, and then it is completely metabolized to benzoic acid within the skin and excreted unchanged in the urine.2,3 No studies on the use of this preparation in pregnant patients have been published; however, systemic effects on a pregnant woman and her child would not be expected and therefore use of this product during pregnancy would not be of concern.”
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3114665/

Benzoyl Peroxide has no known studies proving that it is safe but as it is known to be absorbed (as stated in your comment even) not all OB or Derms agree that it is ok to recommend. It was listed by my OB (at a major University health system) on a hand out given to all patients as an ingredient to avoid, and is very frequently mentioned as an ingredient to avoid elsewhere online and in books. Several of the ingredients on this list are in similar situations, but as I stated it would be nearly impossible to actually do those studies due to ethical concerns.

Firstly, thank you for this information – very helpful indeed! I was wondering whether you have any advice re. makeup and it’s safety during pregnancy. I’ve read that some makeup can contain harmful ingredients such as formaldehyde and toluene. I, like you, am a bit of a makeup junkie and wouldn’t dream of leaving the house without mascara, concealer and my eyebrows done at the very least. Would you consider writing a blog on the subject with suggested products like you did for Pregnancy Safe Skincare (brilliant by the way)?

Most brands update their makeup formulas quite often and the ingredient lists are very difficult to find, so I haven’t been able to write such a post. I would not work about powders, brows and mascara for example as those will sit on the surface of the skin (or on the lashes, which are dead proteins basically), so not a concern.
A quick note- We think of formaldehyde as toxic because it is used in embalming. Surely it must be horrible, right? The truth is that it is an additive to food, and your body is making it as a byproduct to normal processes. Large amounts obviously aren’t good, but even water is toxic in large amounts.

I truly appreciate your website. I am so glad i came across it…
For nursing this momma…. i just bought some products and am wondering if i should return them or use them! If i need to return then i will have to do it asap :/. Would love to hear back from you!
Face wash
INGREDIENTS: (Aqua) Distilled Water, Aloe Vera (Aloe Barbadensis) Gel, Grape Seed (Vitis Vinifera) Oil, Vegetable Glycerine, Jojoba (Buxux Chinensis) Oil, Squalane, Shea (Butyrospermum Parkii) Butter, L-sodium Hyaluronate, Rose Hip Seed (Rosa Rubiginosa) Oil, L-sodium PCA, Vitamin E (D-alpha-tocopherol), Xanthan Gum, Benzyl Alcohol, Azulene, Fruit Extracts, Allantoin
Face wash 2
INGREDIENTS: (Aqua) Distilled Water, Aloe Vera (Aloe Barbadensis) Gel, Grape Seed (Vitis Vinifera) Oil, Vegetable Glycerine, Jojoba (Buxux Chinensis) Oil, Squalane, Shea (Butyrospermum Parkii) Butter, L-sodium Hyaluronate, Rose Hip Seed (Rosa Rubiginosa) Oil, L-sodium PCA, Vitamin E (D-alpha-tocopherol), Xanthan Gum, Benzyl Alcohol, Azulene, Fruit Extracts, Allantoin

Facial MIST
INGREDIENTS: Aloe barbadensis (aloe vera) leaf juice*, Rosa damascena (rose) flower water*, Anthemis nobilis (roman chamomile) flower water*, glycerin, water, Chrithmum maritimum (leaf) extract, hydrolyzed Lupinus albus (lupine) protein*, hydrolyzed Linum usitatissimum (linseed) extract*, Salix nigra (willowbark) extract, glycerin*, Populus tremuloides (aspen) bark extract, Avena sativa (oat) kernel extract*, Oryza sativa (rice) extract*, Spirulina platensis extract*, caprylyl capryl glucoside, Vanillosmopsis erythropappa (bisabolol) wood oil, Helichrysum italicum (immortelle) flower oil*, Cymbopogon martini (palmarosa) leaf oil, sodium hyaluronate, Salvia sclarea (clary sage) flower/leaf oil*. (Ingredients with* were issued from Organic Agriculture. 99.98% of the total of the ingredients are of natural origin, 93.3 % of the total ingredients proceed from Organic Farming)

FACIAL CREAM
INGREDIENTS: Aqua (Water), Glycerin, Glycol Distearate, Lactic Acid (L), Cetyl Alcohol, Stearic Acid, Sodium Hyaluronate (L), Tartaric Acid (L), Malic Acid (L), Ascorbic Acid (L), Phenyl t-Butylnitrone (Spin Trap), Vaccinium Macrocarpon (Cranberry) Fruit Extract, Glucuronolactone (D), Beta Vulgaris (Beet) Root Powder, Betula Alba Bark Extract, Tocotrienols, Elaeis Guineensis (Palm) Oil, Tocopherol (D-alpha), Peumus Boldus Leaf Extract, Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Alcohol, Benzyl Alcohol

AND ONE MORE CREAM
INGREDIENTS: Aqua (Water), Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Cetearyl Olivate, Squalane, Rubus Chamaemorus (Cloud Berry) Seed Oil, Titanium Dioxide, Ribes Nigrum (Black Currant) Seed Oil, Sorbitan Olivate, Glyceryl Stearate, Glycerin, Rosa Canina (Rose Hip) Fruit Oil, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil, Sorbitol, Mica, Iron Oxides, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Oil, Xanthan Gum, Lonicera Caprifolium (Honeysuckle) Flower Extract, Asparagopsis Armata Extract, Ascophyllum Nodosum Extract, Tocopherol (D-alpha), Cinnamomum Cassia (Cinnamon) Leaf Oil, Citric Acid, Eugenia Caryophyllus (Clove) Leaf Oil, Zinc Oxide, Glycine Soja (Soybean) Oil, Hamamelis Virginiana (Witch Hazel) Water, Lonicera Japonica (Honeysuckle) Flower Extract, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil, Zirconium Oxide, Alcohol Denat., Zingiber Officinale (Ginger) Root Oil, Phytic Acid, Peumus Boldus Leaf Extract, Betula Alba Bark Extract.

The references in this post are for those that are pregnant, the list is different if you are nursing. Here’s the post on what to avoid in skincare while breast feeding.

For the products here, I would avoid the facial mist while pregnant due to willow bark, but otherwise the products look safe for nursing and pregnancy.

Yes, Thank you. I believe I did try to write on that page. I did read it and am thankful for the info! Thank you for helping us momma’s. It is difficult to navigate through all the internet information!

I’m wondering if ginseng extract in a nighttime cream is s big no no?

I’ve never seen anything saying to avoid it. Topical use is very different then ingestion.

Hello can I use a facial cream that contains Licorice extract. Thank you. I am 21 weeks pregnant.

No, no licorice root extract.

In Asia it’s strictly prohibited to drink ginseng tea while pregnant. I would choose to avoid it in creams too, going to give up on my Korean brand I love for these months. . I am not Asian myself so I have no idea how it works, but even a sales person told me I better switch to other line of the same brand which doesn’t have ginseng.

It’s more of an old wive’s tale than anything. This review of ginseng during pregnancy is from 2008 and states that it is safe to ingest but to use with caution given some data in animals, but not much has come out since then. This article is from 2016 and shows that the “with caution” concerns for animals can only be found during pregnancy when you treat embryos with very high doses in petri dishes (aka- in vitro) before implanting into the actual animals. Those doses are impossible to reproduce in the animals. They also had the animals ingest large amounts and the same effects were NOT seen. As well, these effects have only been found in animals and with the petri dish treatment, topical treatment will be much lower amounts of absorption.

This is a very informative post. Thank you very much.

Anyhoo, what is your take on skin care products containing Butylene glycol and propylene glycol? Thanks

Those ingredients are both safe

This is so helpful, thank you! Could you advise on the below two products?

Milk Makeup – Sunshine Oil
-Grapefruit and Tangerine Peel Oils: Loaded with vitamins to tone and plump the look of skin.
– Grape Seed Oil and Orange Peel Oil: Packed with anti-inflammatory properties; helps tone and smooth the look of skin.
-Avocado Oil: Hydrates and protects.
– Apricot Kernel Oil and Lemon Peel Oil: Moisturize and revitalize skin.

Vitis Vinifera (Grape) Seed Oil, Persea Gratissima (Avocado) Oil, Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Peel Oil, Citrus Tangerina (Tangerine) Peel Oil, Citrus Nobilis (Mandarin Orange) Peel Oil, Citrus Medica Limonum (Lemon) Peel Oil, Prunus Armeniaca (Apricot) Kernel Oil, Tocopheryl Acetate, Lecithin, Phenoxyethanol, Fragrance.

Algenist
GENIUS Liquid Collagen:
Collagen, Water, Propanediol, Isononyl Isononanoate, Butylene Glycol, Glycerin, Betaine, Pentylene Glycol, Dextrin Palmitate, Collagen Amino Acids, Parachlorella Beijerinckii Exopolysaccharides, Chlorella Protothecoides Oil, Helichrysum Stoechas Extract, Cylindrotheca Fusiformis Extract, Niacinamide, Tocopherol, Palmitoyl Tripeptide-1, Palmitoyl Tetrapeptide-7, Adenosine, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Leuconostoc / Radish Root Ferment Filtrate, Caprylic / Capric Triglyceride, Palmitic Acid, Disodium EDTA, Carbomer, Sodium Lactate, Amodimethicone, Homosalate, Polysorbate 20, Butyl Methoxydibenzoylmethane, 1,2-Hexanediol, Caprylyl Glycol, Octocrylene, Sodium Hydroxide, Phenoxyethanol, Fragrance, Limonene, Beta-Carotene (CI 75130).

Those are both ok to me!

Thank you so much about all your pregnancy advice you’re sharing. I have been doing some research myself but struggle to find any appropriate information about xanthan gum and adenosine in pregnancy skin care. Could you provide any info, please?

Hi, I’d like to know if these brow pencils are same to use? Is iron oxide okay to use? Are there heavy metal? Thank you

Anastasia brow definer
BEHENIC ACID, MICA, RHUS SUCCEDANEA FRUIT WAX/CERA, LANOLIN, TRIETHYLHEXANOIN, SUCROSE TETRASTEARATE TRIACETATE, HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL, SORBITAN SESQUIISOSTEARATE, HYDROGEN DIMETHICONE, CAPRYLYL GLYCOL, HEXYLENE GLYCOL, PHENOXYETHANOL, TOCOPHEROL, MAY CONTAIN/PEUT CONTENIR: (+/-) IRON OXIDES (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499), TITANIUM DIOXIDE (CI 77891), FERRIC FERROCYANIDE (CI 77510)

Benefit goof proof pencil
SYNTHETIC FLUORPHLOGOPITE, STEARIC ACID, HYDROGENATED CASTOR OIL, SYNTHETIC JAPAN WAX, ETHYLHEXYL PALMITATE, CERA ALBA (BEESWAX), SORBITAN SESQUIISOSTEARATE, ALUMINUM HYDROXIDE, TOCOPHEROL. [+/-: CI 19140 (YELLOW 5, YELLOW 5 LAKE), CI 42090 (BLUE 1 LAKE), CI 77007 (ULTRAMARINES), CI 77163 (BISMUTH OXYCHLORIDE), CI 77288 (CHROMIUM OXIDE GREENS), CI 77289 (CHROMIUM HYDROXIDE GREEN), CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499 (IRON OXIDES), CI 77510 (FERRIC FERROCYANIDE, FERRIC AMMONIUM FERROCYANIDE), CI 77742 (MANGANESE VIOLET), CI 77891 (TITANIUM DIOXIDE)]. N° 09825/A

Those are both fine

HI! Do you know if sweet almond oil and sodium lactate are safe during pregnancy?

Is this splash mask safe?

Water, Lactic Acid, Gardenia Florida Fruit Extract, Vaccinium Myrtillus Fruit Extract, Saccharum Officinarum (Sugar Cane) Extract, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Fruit Extract, Citrus Limon (Lemon) Fruit Extract, Acer Saccharum (Sugar Maple) Extract, Panthenol, PPG-26-Buteth-26, PEG-40 Hydrogenated castor oil, 1,2-Hexanediol, Sodium lactate, Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Peel Oil, Citrus Limon (Lemon) Peel Oil, Citrus Aurantium Dulcis (Orange) Oil, Lavandula Hybrida Oil, Juniperus Mexicana Oil, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Oil, Salvia Sclarea (Clary) Oil, Santalum Album (Sandalwood) Oil.

This looks fine to me!

Hi I have been using lip cream with the following ingredients .. please let me know if these are safe to use and I am 21 weeks pregnant now

Deionized Water, Cetyl Stearyl alcohol , cetyl alcohol,Cera alba , Isopropyl Myristate ,Niacinamide , Arbutin, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf extract , phenoxyethanol Flavour

I would avoid this due to the arbutin

Thank you again for these amazing posts!! Your help to us all is so kind and generous!! Most all of my household stuff and personal care is clean/green, but I have had acne problems for years (used BC and BP, etc)… Once I got off those it took me a good while to FINALLY find a product that seem to work for me (with less ingredients, more that I could read). With that being said, would you kindly look at my list below? Kindest regards, Amanda.

LUSH: Vanishing Cream
Linseed Infusion (Linum usitatissimum) Water (Aqua) Rose Water (Rosa Centifolia Flower Water) Lavender Honey Water (Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Flower Water) Cold Pressed Organic Grapeseed Oil (Simmondsia chinensis) Honey (Honey/Miel) Stearic Acid Cold Pressed Organic Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia Chinensis) Witch Hazel Extract (Hamamelis virginiana) Fair Trade Shea Butter (Butyrospermum parkii) Cetearyl Alcohol Triethanolamine Camellia Oil (Camellia Japonica) Lavender Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) Neroli Oil (Citrus Aurantium amara) Geranium Oil (Pelargonium graveolens) Glycerine Tincture of Benzoin (Styrax benzoin) *Geraniol *Limonene *Linalool Fragrance Methylparaben Propylparaben *Occurs naturally in essential oils

LUSH: Fresh Farmacy
Calamine Powder Water (Aqua) Chamomile Decoction (Anthemis nobilis) Elderflower Decoction (Sambucus nigra) Rapeseed Oil (Brassica napus (Rapeseed) Seed Oil) Glycerine Coconut Oil (Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil) Sorbitol Sodium Lauryl Sulfate Sodium Stearate Fragrance Lavender Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) Chamomile Blue Oil (Matricaria chamomilla) Tea Tree Oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) Rose Absolute (Rosa damascena) Sodium Chloride Sodium Hydroxide EDTA Tetrasodium Etidronate *Limonene *Linalool *Occurs naturally in essential oils

LUSH: Sleepy Lotion
Oat Milk (Avena sativa) Almond Oil (Prunus dulcis) Lavender Water (Lavandula Angustifolia) Lavender Flower Infusion (Lavandula angustifolia) Organic Jojoba Oil (Simmondsia chinensis) Glycerine Fair Trade Organic Cocoa Butter (Theobroma cacao) Stearic Acid Illipe Butter (Shorea stenoptera) Triethanolamine Lavender Oil (Lavandula Angustifolia) Benzoin Resinoid (Styrax Tonkinensis Pierre) Tonka Absolute (Dipteryx odorata) Ylang Ylang Oil (Cananga odorata) Cetearyl Alcohol *Benzyl Benzoate *Benzyl Cinnamate *Coumarin *Geraniol *Limonene *Linalool Fragrance Synthetic Fluorphlogopite Titanium Dioxide Tin Oxide Red 28 Blue 1 *Occurs naturally in essential oils

ACURE Eye Cream
WATER/EAU, ALOE BARBADENSIS (ALOE VERA) LEAF JUICE*, EUTERPE OLERACEA (ACAI) FRUIT EXTRACT*, RUBUS FRUTICOSUS (BLACKBERRY) FRUIT EXTRACT*, ROSA CANINA (ROSEHIPS) FRUIT EXTRACT*, PUNICA GRANATUM (POMEGRANATE) FRUIT EXTRACT*, CALENDULA OFFICINALIS (CALENDULA) FLOWER EXTRACT*, MATRICARIA RECUTITA (CHAMOMILE) FLOWER EXTRACT, ASPALATHUS LINEARIS (ROOIBOS) LEAF EXTRACT*, GLYCERYL STEARATE CITRATE, CETEARYL ALCOHOL, GLYCERYL CAPRYLATE, CATHAMUS TINCTORIUS (SAFFLOWER) SEED OIL, THEOBROMA CACAO (COCOA) SEED BUTTER, COCOGLYCERIDES, GLYCERIN, CETEARYL ALCOHOL, HELIANTHUS ANNUUS (SUNFLOWER) SEED OIL, SODIUM LEVULINATE, POTASSIUM, SORBATE, GLYCERYL LAURATE, OENOTHERA BIENNIS (EVENING PRIMROSE) OIL, TOCOPHEROL ACETATE, CHLORELLA VULGARIS EXTRACT, ARGANIA SPINOSA (ARGAN) KERNEL OIL*, UBIQUINONE, LEONTOPODIUM ALPINIUM (EDELWEISS) CULTURE EXTRACT, MARRUBIUM VULGARE (WHITE HOREHOUND) CULTURE EXTRACT. *ORGANIC INGREDIENT / *INGRÉDIENT BIOLOGIQUE

ACURE Body Beautiful Shampoo
WATER/EAU, SODIUM LAUROYL METHYL ISETHIONATE, SODIUM COCOYL ISETHIONATE, BETAINE, COCAMIDOPROPYL HYDROXYSULTAINE, GLYCERIN, COCOGLUCOSIDES HYDROXYPROPYLTRIMONIUM CHLORIDE, SODIUM LEVULINATE, OPUNTIA TUNA (PRICKLY PEAR) OIL, DISODIUM COCOYL GLUTAMATE, GUAR HYDROXYPROPYLTRIMONIUM CHLORIDE, ALOE BARBADENSIS LEAF JUICE, TOCOPHEROL, POTASSIUM SORBATE, FRAGRANCE/PARFUM, SODIUM CHLORIDE, SODIUM HYDROXIDE, PYRUS COMMUNIS (PEAR) FRUIT EXTRACT, FISCUS CARICA (FIG) FRUIT EXTRACT.

ACURE Body Beautiful Conditioner
WATER/EAU, GUAR HYDROXYPROPYLTRIMONIUM CHLORIDE, LACTIC ACID, PANTHENOL, GLYCERIN, TAPIOCA STARCH, CETEARYL GLUCOSIDE, SORBITAN OLIVATE, GLYCERYL STEARATE, CETEARYL ALCOHOL, BEHENTRIMONIUM CHLORIDE, STEARALKONIUM CHLORIDE, ARGANIA SPINOSA (ARGAN) KERNEL OIL, THEOBROMA CAVAO (COCOA) SEED BUTTER, HIPPOPHAE RHAMNOIDES OIL, CUCURBITA PEPO (PUMPKIN) SEED OIL, OPUNTIA FICUS INDICA (PRICKLY PEAR) SEED OIL, TOCOPHEROL ACETATE, L-ARGANINE, GLYCEROPHOSPHOINOSITOL LYSINE, SODIUM LEVULINATE, POTASSIUM SORBATE, LACTIC ACID, FRAGRANCE, PYRUS COMMUNIS (PEAR) FRUIT EXTRACT, FISCUS CARICA (FIG) FRUIT EXTRACT.

ACURE Brightening Facial Scrub
water/eau, aloe barbadensis leaf juice*, euterpe oleracea (acai) fruit extract*, rubus fruticosus (blackberry) fruit extract*, rosa canina (rosehips) fruit extract*, punica granatum (pomegranate) fruit extract*, calendula officinalis (calendula) flower extract*, matricaria recutita (chamomile) flower extract*, aspalathus linearis (rooibos) leaf extract*, vegetable glycerin, sodium methyl cocoyl taurate, juglans reglia (walnut shell) flour, kaolin (french green) clay, sodium lauroamphoacetate, sodium PCA, sodium lauroyl lactylate, citrus limon (lemon) peel granules, glyceryl Laurate, sodium cocoyl isethionate, cellulose gum, glucono delta lactone, chlorophyll, chrondus crispus extract, potassium sorbate, olea europaea (olive) fruit oil, argania spinosa (argan) culture extract, chlorella vulgaris extract, salvia officinalis (sage) leaf extract, mentha spicata (spearmint) leaf extract, laminaria digitata (kelp) powder, lilium candidum leaf (madonna leaf) culture extract. *organic ingredient

CBD: Hype or Hope?

Cannabidiol (CBD) in recent years has become one of the biggest trends in the spa and wellness market. There are countless CBD-infused products on the market from face oils, eye cream and massage oils to supplements, water and even gummies. Why are there so many companies selling CBD products? Is it truly beneficial? Let’s take a step back and look into the history of CBD and how it has become a must-have in the spa and wellness world.

CBD History

Cannabis plants have been around for thousands of years. They were first discovered in ancient China. Cannabis is thought to be the oldest cultivated plant, with remnants dating back to 10,000 BCE. The father of acupuncture and Chinese medicine, Shen Nung, first noted the benefits of cannabis in 4,000 BCE. The benefit of the entire cannabis plant including stalk, stem and seed (which is said to be the most nutritious of any plant) have been noted for thousands of years. Interestingly enough, the cannabis plant was thought to be one of the most powerful healing plants in ancient times.